Welcome community members! Here you will find information and web resources designed specifically for you!  These tools will help you support First Nations, Métis and Inuit students as they move between different stages of school, work and home!

Best Practices

Web Resources for Communities

Best Practices for supporting our children, youth and young adults in their educational success

Our First Nations, Métis and Inuit (FNMI) children, youth and young adults are the future. Communities need to continue to embrace them and support them in their school success. FNMI young people need to feel that they are valued and cared for consistently. They also need to know who they are as FNMI peoples. This is why it is critical to share the language, culture and traditions with them.  Knowing their culture is critical to their self-esteem and identity.

Transitions between the various levels of school and between work and home represent some of the most significant changes that our young people face.  How we support them as they journey between these various stages is critical to their success.

  • Help plan and offer to participate in graduation celebrations (daycare, preschool, Kindergarten, middle school, grade 8, high school, college, university) and other related events
  • Share your knowledge, teachings and skills with them
  • Keep the lines of communication open and let them know that you are proud of them
  • Work with the FNMI Education Counsellor, unit or FNMI organization on activities for FNMI students
  • Volunteer to chaperone FNMI excursions, tours or field trips to schools and other locations
  • Ask them questions about school and what they are learning
  • Be a role model and a mentor 

Best Practices for supporting our young adults and older adults in their careers

Both young and older adults may leave the community to pursue a career or work. Or, they may decide to have a career or job in the community from which they originate.  Either way it is important for the community to be supportive of young and older adults during this transitional period.

  • Share your advice and teachings with them
  • Keep the lines of communication open with them and let them know that you are proud of their personal growth
  • Offer to be a mentor, guide or teacher
  • Ask them questions about their career or job of choice
  • If you own a business, offer an internship or placement if possible
  • Share your knowledge of career and job resources if possible

Best Practices for supporting our young and older adults returning home

Leaving home and coming home can be major “culture shocks” for our FNMI people. Culture shock refers to the feeling of “not fitting in” and “being disoriented”. FNMI people returning home may experience a range of mixed emotions such as excitement, pride, confusion and loneliness. This response is normal and can be less stressful with the support of community members.

  • Keep the lines of communication open and continue to be friendly
  • Share your own experiences, teachings and stories with them
  • Offer to be part of a support network for them
  • Be a part of a “welcoming home” celebration for them
  • Ask the FNMI Education Counsellor, unit or organization how you can be of assistance

Additional Resources

Contact Us

TRANSITIONS
c/o Ontario Native Education Counselling
Association P.O. Box 220, 37 A Reserve Road,
Naughton, Ontario P0M 2M0

Phone: 705-692-2999 Fax: 705-692-9998
Email: oneca@oneca.com